Younghusband Woolstore Urban Renewal Stage 2 Approved in Kensington, Melbourne

Younghusband Wool Store Render
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The Younghusband Woolstore urban renewal project in Kensington, Melbourne, is an innovative and sustainable redevelopment project that was designed by Woods Bagot, a leading global architectural firm. This project is situated in the vibrant suburb of Kensington, just a few kilometres north-west of the Melbourne CBD.

Located on the corner Chelmsford Street and Elizabeth Street, the project involves the adaptive reuse of the historic Younghusband Woolstore, which was built in the early 1900s and is a significant heritage building for Melbourne. The redevelopment project has transformed the Woolstore’s into a mixed-use development that includes residential, commercial, and retail spaces.

The project is being delivered over 3 stages as a joint venture partnership between Built, Ivanhoé Cambridge and Irongate, three property giants in Australia. Once complete, the project will feature over 56,00sqm of NLA, including A-Grade office, retail and residential offerings for the Melbourne market.

Younghusband Woolstore Melbourne
Younghusband Woolstore Melbourne
Younghusband Woolstore Heritage Image
Younghusband Woolstore Heritage Image
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The residential component of the Younghusband Woolstore Redevelopment Project includes a mix of apartments and townhouses. The apartments are designed to maximize natural light and ventilation, with large windows and balconies that provide views of the city skyline. The townhouses are designed to integrate with the surrounding neighbourhood, with private gardens and outdoor spaces that provide a sense of community and connection.

The commercial and retail spaces within the development are designed to be flexible and adaptable, with high ceilings and an open-plan layout that can be customized to suit the needs of different businesses. The development also includes a range of amenities, including a gym, a rooftop terrace, and a communal garden. New feature blustone laneways will connect the spaces internally, with a central town square located in the heart of the precinct offering a space for people to meet, share, socialise, and connect.

The town square will connect to a new activated rail corridor, pedestrian walkway and bicycle pathway.

Younghusband Retail Laneways
Younghusband Retail Laneways
Younghusband Commercial Space
Younghusband Commercial Space
Younghusband Town Square
Younghusband Town Square

Woods Bagot principal Peter Miglis spoke of the design approach to the urban renewal project.

“The design approach is to ‘lightly touch’ the existing wool store buildings, respecting the past while providing contemporary interventions for the next evolution of the buildings’ life.” Said Miglis.

Peter Miglis of Woods Bagot and Deputy Lord Mayor of Melbourne Nicholas Reece launchinng the Younhusband's construction phase.
Peter Miglis of Woods Bagot and Deputy Lord Mayor of Melbourne Nicholas Reece launchinng the Younhusband’s construction phase.

The Younghusband Woolstore redevelopment project is its sustainable design. The project incorporates a range of sustainable design elements and technologies, including energy-efficient lighting, rainwater harvesting, and solar power generation. The rainwater is collected from the roof and used for irrigation and toilet flushing, reducing the demand for potable water. The project also includes the use of sustainable building materials, such as recycled timber and locally sourced stone, which not only reduces the environmental impact of the development but also adds character to the building. The use of natural materials also provides a sense of warmth and comfort to the spaces.

Stage 2 of 3 stages has now been approved for the project which involves the transformation of the historic sawtooth-roofed redbrick warehouse with the addition of a new silo structure. The silo structure will be a unique feature of the development, providing additional residential and commercial spaces. The silo structure will require the demolition of Woolstore No. 5, to be replaced with the eight-storey feature tower. This will replace the original grain silo that was used as the main point for transporting grain stock during it’s farming rennaisance. The new silo has been architecturally designed to mimic the Woolstore’s heritage. The demolition of the existing building and approval of the height increase for the new silo structure were outside of the council’s heritage planning framework, however the approval has been given by the council, with the scale of the heritage retention seen as being “highly positive” for the urban renewal of the site.

Render of the Sawtooth-building with Silo extension
Render of the Sawtooth-building with Silo extension
Stage 2 will feature a spectacular ode to the heritage of the area.
Stage 2 will feature a spectacular ode to the heritage of the area.
Younghusband Stage 2 Render with Silo
Younghusband Stage 2 Render with Silo
Entrance to the new Silo.
Entrance to the new Silo.
Younghusband-Level 2 Commercial Space
Younghusband-Level 2 Commercial Space

The addition of the silo structure provides an opportunity for innovative and flexible design, with high ceilings and an open-plan layout that can be customized to suit the needs of different businesses and residents. The silo will include a mix of residential, commercial, and retail spaces, providing a vibrant and diverse community.

The Younghusband Woolstore Redevelopment Project is an excellent urban renewal example of sustainable and adaptive reuse of heritage buildings. It will transform the historic Woolstore’s into a modern and vibrant mixed-use development that is both environmentally responsible and socially connected.

Note: The information presented in this article is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as legal, financial, or professional advice. While we make every effort to fact-check and verify the information presented, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness. Readers are encouraged to independently verify any information they find on our website and to consult with relevant professionals before making any decisions based on the information presented. The Australian Development Review does not own the rights to the information included within this article, and furthermore, there is no infringement intended from the included text and images within.


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