Nuage Project’s Evolution: Sarazin’s Dual Towers Embrace Educational Observatory Innovation

Observatory Render Nuage
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Sarazin has taken a significant stride forward in their ambitious Nuage project, aimed at transforming Woolloongabba in anticipation of the highly awaited 2032 Brisbane Summer Olympics. Their dual tower project has recently seen the submission of a fresh development application, signifying a bold progression in their vision. This new application introduces a pioneering concept to the Australian landscape – the integration of an educational rooftop observatory. This innovative addition is set to facilitate a partnership with the esteemed University of Queensland, thereby contributing to the growth of Woolloongabba as an integral part of Brisbane’s Knowledge Corridor.

Sarazin's Nuage Concept Designs with Observatory by HAL
Sarazin’s Nuage Concept Designs with Observatory by HAL

Sarazin have introduced revised blueprints for their expansive venture, which occupies a generous 4,057 sqm expanse spanning across 6-18 Wellington Road and 25 Nile Street. The new plans outline the construction of two towers, one reaching 37 levels and the other 27 levels in height. Together, these towers will accommodate a total of 582 modern apartments. This notable departure from their prior application, which proposed a pair of adjacent 20-level towers housing 368 apartments, secured approval in October 2022.

Initially aligned with the Woolloongabba Centre Neighbourhood Plan’s height cap of 20 levels, these new plans signify a resolute shift among developers, catalysed by the Olympic nod and underscored by the population surge projected in the recently divulged Draft Shaping SEQ Report. As the urban landscape transforms, Sarazin stands at the forefront, pioneering the metamorphosis of Woolloongabba.

Nuage Architectural Concept Plan
Nuage Architectural Concept Plan
Nuage Dual Towers Rising Up in Woolloongabba
Nuage Dual Towers Rising Up in Woolloongabba

Saunders Havill Group‘s comprehensive Town Planning Report has provided a substantial perspective on the ongoing wave of transformation in Woolloongabba. The report spotlights significant developments in the area, illustrating the evolving urban landscape. Among these notable projects is Station Square, a substantial $1.2 billion undertaking by Trenert, boasting a configuration of five towering structures that will ascend to an impressive 40 storeys. Another striking addition is the Gabba Heart build-to-rent initiative, recently introduced and soaring towards an impressive 41 levels along with Canopy House by Aria, poised to touch the sky at 30 levels. This compilation of projects paints a dynamic panorama of the changing cityscape. Sarazin’s very own Murcia Residences development, currently for sale, is being delivered directly across from their Nuage masterpiece.

Murcia by Sarazin Woolloongabba
Murcia by Sarazin Woolloongabba

In light of these developments, Saunders Havill Group highlights the favorable stance of the Brisbane City Council towards heightened construction in regions that are strategically linked to transportation hubs, although distanced from the city center. Examples include Buranda, where heights can reach up to 25 storeys, and Toowong, where heights can extend to 30 storeys. The Kiripla precinct at the northern end of South Brisbane has also been greenlit for an unlimited height transformation, signalling the intent for increased density into Brisbane’s rapidly growing urban areas. This augmentation in architectural stature aligns with the essence of the core precinct, which is poised to accommodate the most intensive forms of development.

A particularly innovative aspect embedded within the fresh architectural blueprints is the collaborative effort aimed at advancing knowledge and scientific intrigue. Through a partnership involving Sarazin, the University of Queensland, and the Big Questions Institute, plans envision the incorporation of a private and public rooftop observatory atop the taller tower. This initiative adds a distinct celestial dimension to the ambitious project, promising to engage and captivate.

As the Nuage project continues to take shape, the impact of HAL Architects remains prominently evident. Their architectural design principles, as outlined in the manifesto submitted to the Brisbane City Council, highlight Nuage’s ability to harmonize light, air, and architectural excellence. The design’s cloud-like form embodies subtropical grace, offering an iconic addition to Brisbane’s evolving skyline. The residential towers’ organic and graceful contours enhance natural light, ventilation, and panoramic views, blending seamlessly with the urban surroundings.

“Nuage Woollongabba has been designed as a living work of art, a poetic subtropical sculptural delight to be enjoyed by both its occupants and the public realm as both a micro and macro inner city urban celebration of design excellence.” HAL Architects

Sarazin's Nuage Rooftop Areas with Observatory for the New Application
Sarazin’s Nuage Rooftop Areas with Observatory for the New Application
Rooftop Design Concepts by HAL
Rooftop Design Concepts by HAL

Within the heart of Woolloongabba, extending its influence to the fringes of East Brisbane, Sarazin steadfastly continues its mission to redefine urban living through the prestigious Murcia Residences. This undertaking stands as a testament to their resolute commitment to reshape and redefine the urban landscape. With this fervent dedication, Woolloongabba emerges as a distinguished architectural gem, embodying modernity and echoing the city’s aspirations.

Note: The information presented in this article is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as legal, financial, or professional advice. While we make every effort to fact-check and verify the information presented, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness. Readers are encouraged to independently verify any information they find on our website and to consult with relevant professionals before making any decisions based on the information presented. The Australian Development Review does not own the rights to the information included within this article, and furthermore, there is no infringement intended from the included text and images within.


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