Sydney Metro West Project Unveils Plans for Rosehill Racecourse Redevelopment

Rosehill Racecourse Redevelopment Plans ADR
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The New South Wales government has officially released plans for the redevelopment of Rosehill Racecourse as part of the Metro West project, unveiled on Wednesday. The multi-billion-dollar initiative, which faced delays due to concerns over costs and timelines, has now been confirmed to proceed.

A memorandum of understanding has been signed between the Minns government and the Australian Turf Club to execute the proposed redevelopment of the Rosehill Racecourse. The iconic racecourse is slated to be replaced by 25,000 new residential properties, green spaces, and a Metro West station, supplementing the existing plans for the underground rail network.

This redevelopment is part of a comprehensive strategy aimed at constructing 138,000 new dwellings in rezoned sites across 31 suburbs, along with 47,800 homes near eight major transport hubs within the next 15 years.

The plan entails the complete relocation of Rosehill Gardens Racecourse, making way for the construction of 25,000 new homes, green areas, and a Metro station. While the specific relocation site for the racecourse remains undisclosed, the government has identified several potential locations.

Sydney Metro West Stations proposed to be built by 2030
Sydney Metro West Stations proposed to be built by 2030
Sydney Metro West Proposed Network to include Rosehill Racecourse extention
Sydney Metro West Proposed Network to include Rosehill Racecourse extention

Collaborating on this transformative venture, the Minns government and the ATC are jointly investing $5 billion. These funds will not only support the relocation of Rosehill Gardens Racecourse but also contribute to the rebuilding and development of existing racecourses and facilities at Warwick Farm and Royal Randwick.

To accommodate the relocation of 300-400 horses from Rosehill Gardens stables, a state-of-the-art horse training facility will be established at Horsley Park. Rosehill Racecourse is expected to transition gradually to its new location by the end of the decade, according to the ATC.

In line with the NSW government’s housing policy, the focus is on vertical development rather than urban sprawl. Premier Chris Minns emphasized the commitment to delivering 210,800 homes, with 25,000 of them proposed for the Rosehill site.

NSW Premier Chris Minns Announced the Rosehill Racecourse redevelopment and Metro West extention plans
NSW Premier Chris Minns Announced the Rosehill Racecourse redevelopment and Metro West extention plans
Western Sydney is transitioning to a higher density corridor.
Western Sydney is transitioning to a higher density corridor.

The first stage of the plan will involve rezoning areas around metro and train stations in Bankstown, Bays West, Bella Vista, Crows Nest, Homebush, Hornsby, Kellyville, and Macquarie Park. The objective is to build 47,800 homes within 1200 meters of transport in these suburbs over the next 15 years.

To support the influx of residents, the state government will allocate $520 million for infrastructure development, including road upgrades and open spaces.

In the second stage, 138,000 new dwellings will be delivered by rezoning 31 suburbs for higher density housing within 400 meters of their metro or train station. This includes areas such as:

  • Adamstown,
  • Ashfield
  • Banksia
  • Berala
  • Booragul
  • Canterbury
  • Corrimal
  • Croydon
  • Dapto
  • Dulwich Hill
  • Gordon
  • Gosford
  • Hamilton
  • Killara
  • Kogarah
  • Kotara
  • Lidcombe
  • Lindfield
  • Marrickville
  • Morisset
  • Newcastle Interchange
  • North Strathfield Metro
  • North Wollongong
  • Rockdale
  • Roseville
  • St Marys Metro
  • Teralba
  • Tuggerah
  • Turrella
  • Wiley Park
  • Wyong.
Sydney's Transport Orientated Development Precincts Proposed
Sydney’s Transport Orientated Development Precincts Proposed

Developers within these zones will benefit from a fast-tracked approvals process, termed ‘State Significant Development,’ ensuring the swift construction of approved projects over $60 million, with construction commencement within two years of approval.

The government’s assertion of control over planning laws around town centers across the state will enforce the construction of mid-rise residential apartment blocks in permissible areas, eliminating the ability of councils to obstruct proposals based on building height.

Note: The information presented in this article is for general informational purposes only and should not be relied upon as legal, financial, or professional advice. While we make every effort to fact-check and verify the information presented, we cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness. Readers are encouraged to independently verify any information they find on our website and to consult with relevant professionals before making any decisions based on the information presented. The Australian Development Review does not own the rights to the information included within this article, and furthermore, there is no infringement intended from the included text and images within.


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